20-something slightly married lady and amateur fanthropologist that reblogs every goddamn thing and occasionally tries to write fiction

BABY: [builds tower with blocks]
ME: ok this is very good
under capitalism massive building projects are constructed through wage slavery
and through their sheer size and scale intimidate and pacify the masses
so this is a great comment
BABY: [knocks over tower]
ME: that’s right

asheathes:

WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: USA

The Young Witches and Wizards’ Preparatory Academy in Magic is not one but two single-sex schools hidden deep within the misty green swamps of Louisiana. The schools are widely known amongst the American wizarding community for it’s infamous reputation of being the rowdiest academy for young wizards and witches resulting from a fierce inter-school rivalry cultivated through centuries of competition and trickery-wars. Students are frequenters of the headmistress and headmaster’s offices for hexing unsuspecting muggle wanderers, and hosting inter-school midnight dueling matches in the marshes. Legend has it that there is a gargantuan alligator, the unfortunate victim of various experimental (and ultimately irreversible) engorgio charms, lurking in the general vicinity of the schools, although no one has laid eyes on the beast in centuries.

fairy-wren:

house martin gathering mud

(photos by m.geven)

thebest-memes:

"No matter how bad you fuck up at work, you didn’t fucked up this bad"

thebest-memes:

"No matter how bad you fuck up at work, you didn’t fucked up this bad"

thymoss:

railroadsoftware:

no one ever says that Rome needed help from aliens to build their empire

#l laughed for days when i found out that #ancient egyptians used water to reduce friction and move blocks for distances #and that this was literally DEPICTED ON THEIR HIEROGLYPHICS #but ~western archaeologists~ #thought that the pouring of water depicted ~superstitious rituals~ #jfc

necroticnymph:

frauleinninja:

Otachi - Dragon*con 2014

Made and modeled by me (FB)
Photography by Soulfire Studios

"Movement in the breach… Category 4…"

Aquarium night at Dragon*con was unbelievable. Otachi was fun to wear during the day, and the Pacific Rim meetup was amazing, but I swear once it got dark out it hit a whole other level of epic kaiju destruction awesome. I felt like I was freaking becoming Otachi, surrounded by all the nighttime marine biospheres - the lights looked sooo cool in the exhibits!! And of course any chance to shoot with Soulfire (a huge Pacific Rim fan) is going to produce incredible work. I feel like Otachi is emerging from the breach in these photos, and she’s about to destroy Hong Kong (or Atlanta). Do your worst, PPDC…

While I consider myself a pretty experienced sewer, I had absolutely never worked with craft foam outside of simple, teensy props. I’m writing up on a big breakdown of exactly how I made the spinal column and tail, but for now I’ll just say it was a huge endeavor! There are 162 individual foam pieces in the spine/tail, and 32 LEDs. Phew! Now where’s a Gipsy Danger I can drag into the stratosphere??

More photos and breakdowns can be found here!

Nah son how does this have under a thousand notes? This is INCREDIBLE!

nearly-headless-horseman:

strugglingtobeheard:

atriptothemorg:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Six Facts About Harriet Tubman
1. Harriet Tubman’s birth name was Aramita (“Minty”) Ross. She was born enslaved in Maryland sometime in 1820.
2. Tubman escaped slavery with her brother, Ben and Harry, on September 17, 1849.

3. Tubman is most famous for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, in which she led escaped slaves to freedom. Estimates vary, but Tubman is said to have helped anywhere from dozens to hundreds of slaves reach freedom. She was once quoted as saying, “I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.”
4. During the Civil War, Tubman worked for the Union army as a cook, nurse, and spy. She was also the first woman to lead an expedition in the war and guided the Combahee River Raid, which freed 700 slaves. Decades later, the raid would inspire a groundbreaking group of black feminists called the Combahee River Collective.
5. Tubman’s life has inspired countless works for art, including poems, comic books, and films.
6. This year marks that 100th anniversary of Harriet Tubman’s death. Maryland has a series of commemorative events. 

The last one really hits me. She had only been dead for 100 years. 100 years. Like, white folks are going on and on about how slavery has been over for hundreds and hundreds of years.
But here is an escaped slave who liberated countless others that only died ONE HUNDRED YEARS ago. This is not the ancient past. This is still living history.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


The only thing school taught me about Harriet Tubman over and over again was that she did the Underground Railroad. I have never seen her real name or any of these other mind blowing facts about her life like she was James Bond during the civil war like whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat this is what the fuck we should be learning about what a boss

nearly-headless-horseman:

strugglingtobeheard:

atriptothemorg:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Six Facts About Harriet Tubman

1. Harriet Tubman’s birth name was Aramita (“Minty”) Ross. She was born enslaved in Maryland sometime in 1820.

2. Tubman escaped slavery with her brother, Ben and Harry, on September 17, 1849.

Harriet_Tubman_Reward_Notice_1849.jpg

3. Tubman is most famous for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, in which she led escaped slaves to freedom. Estimates vary, but Tubman is said to have helped anywhere from dozens to hundreds of slaves reach freedom. She was once quoted as saying, “I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.”

4. During the Civil War, Tubman worked for the Union army as a cook, nurse, and spy. She was also the first woman to lead an expedition in the war and guided the Combahee River Raid, which freed 700 slaves. Decades later, the raid would inspire a groundbreaking group of black feminists called the Combahee River Collective.

5. Tubman’s life has inspired countless works for art, including poemscomic books, and films.

6. This year marks that 100th anniversary of Harriet Tubman’s death. Maryland has a series of commemorative events

The last one really hits me. She had only been dead for 100 years. 100 years. Like, white folks are going on and on about how slavery has been over for hundreds and hundreds of years.

But here is an escaped slave who liberated countless others that only died ONE HUNDRED YEARS ago. This is not the ancient past. This is still living history.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

The only thing school taught me about Harriet Tubman over and over again was that she did the Underground Railroad. I have never seen her real name or any of these other mind blowing facts about her life like she was James Bond during the civil war like whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat this is what the fuck we should be learning about what a boss